Our Mission

Combating Racial and Socioeconomic Inequality

More than a half-century after Brown v. Board of Education, American schools remain deeply separate and profoundly unequal. Educational disparities are particularly stark in urban schools were many new teachers arrive with little preparation or support, and, unable to deal with challenges, they leave. This frequent teacher turnover negatively impacts every aspect of the school, but most critically, children.

At Urban Teachers, our mission is to improve educational and life outcomes of children in urban schools by preparing culturally competent, effective career teachers who accelerate student achievement and disrupt systems of racial and socioeconomic inequity.

And, our values support that work:

WE SERVE CHILDREN.
Children are the center of our work. We rely on the communities we serve to guide and inform the decisions we make about our curriculum, program and practice.

WE ARE AN ANTI-RACIST ORGANIZATION.
We are committed to ongoing knowledge seeking, reflection, and action to deliberately oppose racism.  We are an inclusive organization that values the diversity of people, backgrounds and perspectives. We are active allies who pursue justice in the communities in which we live and work.

WE ARE LIFE-LONG LEARNERS.
We are dedicated to continuous improvement, innovation and excellence. We strive to be on the forefront of what is best for teacher education and students based on research and practice.

WE VALUE EACH OTHER.
We value each other as whole people. We are servant leaders who foster a supportive working environment that is empathetic and caring, and values direct, constructive feedback.

It is our vision that every student in the United States is taught by committed, well-prepared, culturally competent teachers.

Insights

“The biggest change I’ve seen in myself is a change in self-confidence and trusting myself to plan ahead, execute the lesson and knowing that I am and can be a good teacher because my kids deserve a great teacher and I’m working hard to become one.”

Cameron S., Emerson College, Medfield, Massachusetts, Cohort 2017